Amish’s Warrior of Mithila fuses the mythological with the contemporary

Amish’s Warrior of Mithila fuses the mythological with the contemporary

Sita: Warrior of Mithila, the second book in the Ramchandra series by Amish Tripathi, has gone out, and no doubt he will sell a million copies or more. And I feel very happy, if not for nothing else, because Amish, despite his status as a star writer, remains as humble and cool as nine years ago that he had trouble getting. The first part Of his Shiva trilogy was published.
It is a man who has his feet firmly on the ground and has not dropped his celebrity head.
Amish tries a new narrative technique here, which he calls “hyperlink” and others refer to “multiline narrative.” What this means is that a book follows the story with person A, because the central character and the other follow person B. Both narratives converge toward a particular point, then the author takes the books following.
So, while the first book in the Ramchandra series, Scion of Ikshvaku, had Ram as his protagonist, the second book follows Sita, from childhood to her upbringing at her marriage with Ram. Both books end with Raavan’s abduction of Sita.
As a result, many of the events described are common to both books, except that the first book told us about Ram’s role as things unfolded, and the second did the same for Sita.
Like all other Amish books, Warrior of Mithila is a siege thriller full of action, treachery and intense enmity, but also to explore much deeper problems. As always, a reader can appreciate Mithila’s warrior as a precious reading, and another can look into the important issues that Amish raises, both eternal and contemporary. These issues affect our lives, our public discourse and our society.
Even the jallikattu mafouille game – which was the subject of a ban a few months ago – features (Amish seems to be pro-jallikattu).
If I can boast a bit, I can say that I was the first to emphasize the subtext in Amish’s books in my column “Why Amish is Special” in Mint two years ago. I mentioned that Shiva’s trilogy basically tried to answer the question “What is wrong?” And the Ramchandra series seemed to tackle “which society is ideal?
These were my own deductions and Amish had not yet spoken publicly about this aspect of his works. Now, however, in his interviews, he acknowledged that this was what his books were about.
In the Warrior of Mithila, Queen Sunaina tells her adopted daughter Sita: “Criminals among the rich are primarily motivated by greed, and they can negotiate with greed.” But criminals among the poor are driven by despair and despair. Anger … They have nothing to lose, and they get angry when they see others with so little, so it’s understandable. To change things for the better, but it can not happen overnight If we take too rich to help the poor, the rich will rebel, causing chaos, and everyone will suffer. So we need to help the really poor, that is dharma. ”
The 60s and 70s, when Indira Gandhi imposed extremely usurious taxes on the rich, come to mind. What it provoked was only generalized tax evasion and corruption ……….

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